Tag: Metabolic Testing

, by Guru Performance

COULD YOUR CALORIE EQUATION BE THE REASON WHY YOU AREN’T MAKING GAINS?

FUEL UP FEATURE: By Pedro van Gaalen, Editor – Fitness Magazine, South Africa (p86-88, May-June 2016 Edition)

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NUTRITION PLAYS A MAJOR ROLE in our ability to perform or to build the body we desire, alongside the right type of training. For example, in our quest to add significant muscle to our physiques we know that we need to create a calorie surplus by eating quality food sources, especially protein, to support our recovery and drive the anabolic rebuilding process following intense weight training. In terms of performance, we need to ensure we are ingesting the right amount of calories to fuel our training sessions and racing, and also aid recovery. It is also important to know what source of those calories would best serve our needs. However, when we stop making gains or underperform we’re quick to point to a training plateau as the culprit. Seldom do we consider that the cause of our inability to add muscle or maintain peak performance may have started right at the beginning, back when we first sat down to calculate our daily calorie requirements.Screen Shot 2016-05-10 at 08.36.08

ARE EQUATIONS GUESSTIMATIONS?

You see, recent research has uncovered that the common equations many of us rely on to calculate a key component in the energy balance equation – our resting or basal metabolic rate (RMR) – can be woefully inaccurate. Even many of the common devices used today to determine your RMR via body composition analysis can differ somewhat from more accurate measures such as gas exchange testing (also known as indirect calorimetry) to determine resting substrate (energy) utilisation. What that effectively means is that we’re potentially under-dosing our bodies with the fuel they need to perform at optimal levels. It’s a common issue recently highlighted by the Guru Performance Institute, the UK’s leading specialist consultancy for performance nutrition, exercise physiology, wellness and weight management, located in Mayfair, London. Scott Robinson, Exercise Physiologist & Performance Nutritionist, and the Assistant Programme Director, ISSN Diploma Post Graduate Programme at the Guru Performance Institute, explains that an accurate measure of RMR is required to determine exactly how many calories your body burns at rest each day. “This is crucial to determine your daily calorie requirements or targets based on specific goals, be it enhanced performance, muscle gain or weight loss, when combined with your active metabolic rate – your energy expenditure from daily activity and exercise. It is also essential for monitoring of metabolic adaptations to dieting and training”, he adds. The Resting Metabolic Rate (Resting Energy Expenditure) + Resting Substrate Utilisation test that Guru Performance offers “determines the amount of calories required (at rest) per day,” according to the Guru Performance website. “The information we derive from these tests can also help us determine the balance of fuels utilised at rest – the amount of protein, carbohydrate and fat that is oxidised – which is important information in the broader picture”, asserts Robinson. In this regard, it is best to “test, don’t guess”, advocates the Guru Performance Institute. With this scientific approach, the Guru Performance Institute helps numerous elite athletes to optimise their performance. “We also have a number of ‘weekend warrior’ athletes who visit the institute, but our focus with them is to use these tests and protocols to improve their health and weight first, which then has a beneficial impact on their performance. We also work with people in the general population who want to change their body composition, particularly those who may have reached a plateau in terms of weight loss or muscle gain.” 18% MUSCLES 19% OTHER 19% BRAIN 10% KIDNEYS 7% HEART LIVER 27%

“THE INFORMATION WE DERIVE FROM THESE TESTS CAN HELP US DETERMINE THE BALANCE OF FUELS UTILISED AT REST WHICH IS IMPORTANT INFORMATION IN THE BROADER PICTURE.”

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, by Guru Performance

5C5AE575-E8C5-4948-963E-19621E3E11A2[26]By Sam Challis, Cyclist Magazine, Issue 41 – November 2015

In the land of cycling nutrition, carbohydrate is king. It provides the quick hit of energy required to get riders through the interval sessions that we’re told we need to build power and speed. The result is that we have become loyal subjects to the mighty carbs, and our bodies have become reliant on them for fuelling our rides. But it could be that we are serving the wrong master. Broadly speaking, the average cyclist carries enough glycogen (carbohydrate stored in the muscles) to fuel about 90 minutes of activity – barely enough to get most riders to their first cafe stop. Further, carbohydrate oxidation (ie burning energy) has a strong correlation with lactate production, which limits performance. So to improve, we need to become more metabolically efficient, which is why Cyclist has come to Guru Performance in Mayfair, London, to see Laurent Bannock, a scientist at the forefront of metabolic efficiency training.

All hail fat

‘Metabolic efficiency is the ability of an individual to utilise their most significant on-board fuel supply – body fat – for as much of the exercise duration as possible,’ Bannock says. ‘Fat is the most sustainable energy source for an athlete, and delays the accumulation of lactic acid by sparing glycogen stores. However the situation is complicated by the fact that an athlete must also be metabolically flexible – able to switch rapidly and proficiently between the body’s fuel sources to match the fluctuating intensities of competitive events. Don’t worry, we’ll revisit this later,’ he tells me with a grin, as if sensing my growing incomprehension.

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, by Guru Performance

Episode 58 of the Guru Performance ‘We Do Science’ Podcast! In this episode I (Laurent Bannock) discuss ‘Test, Don’t Guess! Using Physiological Testing to Inform Practice’ with Shawn Arent PhD, Rutgers University, USA. In this session we get into:

  • Test, Don’t Guess!
  • Laboratory testing in applied sport science
  • Field testing methods
  • Using lab and field test data to inform practice
  • Validity & Reliability
  • Testing methods to support team sports & individuals
  • Context (of course)

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