Tag: NEAT

, by Guru Performance

Episode 84 of the Guru Performance ‘We Do Science’ Podcast! In this episode I (Laurent Bannock) discuss ‘Impact of Non Exercise Activity” with Professor Dylan Thompson, University of Bath, UK. In this session we get into:

  • Defining ‘Exercise’ & ‘Physical Activity’
  • Non Exercise Physical Activity & Energy Expenditure (NEAT)
  • Significance of Non-Exercise Physical Activity to Total Energy Expenditure
  • Structured exercise as a supplemental stimulus to energy expenditure
  • Impact of variability in physical activity on physiological outcomes
  • Behavioural Compensation
  • Testing & monitoring non-exercise physical activity & energy expenditure
  • Future research

Key Papers:

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, by Guru Performance

COULD YOUR CALORIE EQUATION BE THE REASON WHY YOU AREN’T MAKING GAINS?

FUEL UP FEATURE: By Pedro van Gaalen, Editor – Fitness Magazine, South Africa (p86-88, May-June 2016 Edition)

READ THE FULL VERSION OF THIS: DOWNLOAD FULL ARTICLE AS A PDF

NUTRITION PLAYS A MAJOR ROLE in our ability to perform or to build the body we desire, alongside the right type of training. For example, in our quest to add significant muscle to our physiques we know that we need to create a calorie surplus by eating quality food sources, especially protein, to support our recovery and drive the anabolic rebuilding process following intense weight training. In terms of performance, we need to ensure we are ingesting the right amount of calories to fuel our training sessions and racing, and also aid recovery. It is also important to know what source of those calories would best serve our needs. However, when we stop making gains or underperform we’re quick to point to a training plateau as the culprit. Seldom do we consider that the cause of our inability to add muscle or maintain peak performance may have started right at the beginning, back when we first sat down to calculate our daily calorie requirements.Screen Shot 2016-05-10 at 08.36.08

ARE EQUATIONS GUESSTIMATIONS?

You see, recent research has uncovered that the common equations many of us rely on to calculate a key component in the energy balance equation – our resting or basal metabolic rate (RMR) – can be woefully inaccurate. Even many of the common devices used today to determine your RMR via body composition analysis can differ somewhat from more accurate measures such as gas exchange testing (also known as indirect calorimetry) to determine resting substrate (energy) utilisation. What that effectively means is that we’re potentially under-dosing our bodies with the fuel they need to perform at optimal levels. It’s a common issue recently highlighted by the Guru Performance Institute, the UK’s leading specialist consultancy for performance nutrition, exercise physiology, wellness and weight management, located in Mayfair, London. Scott Robinson, Exercise Physiologist & Performance Nutritionist, and the Assistant Programme Director, ISSN Diploma Post Graduate Programme at the Guru Performance Institute, explains that an accurate measure of RMR is required to determine exactly how many calories your body burns at rest each day. “This is crucial to determine your daily calorie requirements or targets based on specific goals, be it enhanced performance, muscle gain or weight loss, when combined with your active metabolic rate – your energy expenditure from daily activity and exercise. It is also essential for monitoring of metabolic adaptations to dieting and training”, he adds. The Resting Metabolic Rate (Resting Energy Expenditure) + Resting Substrate Utilisation test that Guru Performance offers “determines the amount of calories required (at rest) per day,” according to the Guru Performance website. “The information we derive from these tests can also help us determine the balance of fuels utilised at rest – the amount of protein, carbohydrate and fat that is oxidised – which is important information in the broader picture”, asserts Robinson. In this regard, it is best to “test, don’t guess”, advocates the Guru Performance Institute. With this scientific approach, the Guru Performance Institute helps numerous elite athletes to optimise their performance. “We also have a number of ‘weekend warrior’ athletes who visit the institute, but our focus with them is to use these tests and protocols to improve their health and weight first, which then has a beneficial impact on their performance. We also work with people in the general population who want to change their body composition, particularly those who may have reached a plateau in terms of weight loss or muscle gain.” 18% MUSCLES 19% OTHER 19% BRAIN 10% KIDNEYS 7% HEART LIVER 27%

“THE INFORMATION WE DERIVE FROM THESE TESTS CAN HELP US DETERMINE THE BALANCE OF FUELS UTILISED AT REST WHICH IS IMPORTANT INFORMATION IN THE BROADER PICTURE.”

READ THE FULL VERSION OF THIS: DOWNLOAD FULL ARTICLE AS A PDF

, by Guru Performance

Episode 79 of the Guru Performance ‘We Do Science’ Podcast! In this episode I (Laurent Bannock) discuss ‘Energy Balance, Imbalance & Interactions’ with Dr James Betts, University of Bath, UK. In this session we get into:

  • Defining Energy Balance (in Biological Systems)
  • Energy Balance Interactions
  • Compensatory Mechanisms
  • Total, Type, Timing (Diet / Activity) and Energy Balance
  • Breakfast and Energy Balance
  • Exercise, Overfeeding and Energy Balance

Key Papers

SUBSCRIBE TO THE GURU PERFORMANCE PODCAST:

For the full catalogue of the Guru Performance We Do Science Podcast, including MP3 downloads, web player etc – go to our Libsyn Syndication Web Page

Also available on iTunes and Stitcher